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Once upon a time,

during a great famine, a tired and hungry stranger entered the village. The people were afraid because they had very little food in their cupboards and didn’t want to give any to the stranger. The stranger picked up a rock and called the villagers to gather around him. “I know we are all poor and have very little for ourselves, but might I offer you some stone soup?” The villagers ridiculed such an idea at first, but remained in the town square to watch with curiosity as he lit a fire, put a pot on to boil, and dropped the stone into the water. “Mmm, this is delicious,” said the stranger, “but what would make it even better is a bit of cabbage.” An old woman nodded and said she had a head of cabbage in her garden. She hurried to bring it to the stranger. The stranger suggested other items such as meat, carrots, onions, potatoes and salt and pepper. The villagers scattered, excited to contribute what little they had, and brought back their humble, but heartfelt offerings. The stranger mixed the ingredients into the soup. Each villager brought their bowl, and together, they all sat down in the park to enjoy what from meager beginnings became a feast.

~ Based on a folk tale shared in many cultures

Stone Soup Framework for Diversity, Equity and Integration

StoryArk offers youth programming centered around diversity, equity and inclusion that relieves the pressure on the schools, offers strong positive outcomes for students, and increases the impact for school districts and the communities they serve. Our “Stone Soup” framework strives with intention and care, to develop the best programming possible in current realities.

Working with schools, nonprofit partners, community organizations local to each district, foundations and government entities, StoryArk is able to fulfill five outcomes for school districts and their students:

.1

Student Storytelling Opportunities

empower, uplift, and amplify youth voices and provide pathways towards increased communication skills, cultural fluency, technological literacy, leadership development, job skills, and creative expression

.2

Professional Development Services

bring student storytelling and perspectives to teachers and administrators and make an authentic impact as the shared stories of youth shift the mindsets of educators and increase empathy and understanding of the student experience

.3

The A&I Network

re-energizes districts’ Achievement and Integration professionals and provides an active network of peers to share experiences, seek advice, and learn of additional A&I opportunities for their schools

.4

Braided Funding Opportunities

including Achievement and Integration dollars, grant funding from public and private foundations, and the individual contributions of donors assures that all student needs can be met and breaks down barriers to participation for both school districts and for students

.5

Evaluative Models

of student programming and professional development provide individual school districts with the data needed to assess programming and show outcomes for A&I reporting.

Student stories serve as bridges to understanding while minimizing polarization. Within the “Stone Soup” framework, the students themselves become the change agents needed in schools, districts, and their communities.

Want to find out more?

Contact

Meghan Bridges

Mbridges@storyark.org

Steph Atkins

Steph@storyark.org